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wally word. we pretty would bring an end to legalized plunder in america and we hang your mercy upon us to tour forcible some of our lord and savior jesus christ and his blessed name we pray amen. [cheering] ladies and gentlemen negative the leader of the online tax revolt. i want to introduce now someone most of us know mark william, his place is ringing out across the country for conservative principles and. mark is going to be helping introduce the great participants in the tea party expressed and other grass-roots today. mark, come up here and say a word. [cheering] >> wish me luck. i am on with joh this afternoon to follow up on the number one youtube hit. thank you for being here that t. purdy express comes and we started in nevada 27th. 25,000 people joined uso wish him every read a happy retirement. [cheering] moments ago the national press club we announced our endorsement and commitment of resources to elect nevada state legislators geren ingalls to replace harry reid. yesterday even though i live in boston, i live in california but my home state is boston. we were there with
of massachusetts for america. jericho you are doing all the hard work though. the only way this country gets fixed is if you do the work in the trenches. we can get you revved up and connected with people but at the end of the day it is organizing committee. it is keeping the hammer down with e-mails and letters and phone calls to restore a constitutional republic to the united states of america. [cheering] don't you dare let anyone tell you you are a racist, angry or are a mob. [cheering] we are a human rights movement. what we are doing is based on the united states constitution. [cheering] the i united states constitution sets up america as the only society in the history of mankind press on the idea that the only legitimate reason for government was to protect the individual civil liberties and rights of citizens. [cheering] it is impossible to be a racist, human rights advocate who anybody thinks the city its food and on the fringes what missiles lines have anything to do i have news for you, america is our country and we are taking it back to triet [cheering] all right. god, country, family.
will support and defend the constitution and laws of the united states of america against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that i will bear arms on behalf of the united states when required by law, that i will perform non-combat service in the armed forces of the united states when required by law, that i will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by law, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, so help me god. congratulations, new citizens. [applause] . it takes a very special individual to serve and defend a nation that is not yet fully your own. that is what each of you are doing, and that his testimony to your strong sense of patriotism. our nation thanks you for your service. we owe the freedoms we enjoy to the sacrifices of men and women like you. since september 11, 2001, the united states citizenship and immigration services as naturalized over 58,000 members of our armed services. since last year we have offered non citizen enlistees the oppor
as their opportunity for unchallenged social experimentation. as i meet with you, the grassroots of america, i had never seen the kind of anger growing right now. [applause] smart people who study this kind of thing tallis that anger -- tell us that anger is usually a mask for fear. why do the citizens of the greatest nation on earth have reason to be fearful? it is because we love our country. we love the first principles of liberty and opportunity. we love the american dream. we want it for ourselves and for our children. this is the promised land. this is the place that people have always come to buy land, by sea, by hook or by crook. when people living under tyrants are secretly planning their escape, this land is the preferred destination. [applause] why is that? is it because our soil grows better corn? is it something in the water? are we just nicer here? if you have spent any time in rush hour traffic, you know that is not necessarily the case. america is supposed to be the place that you come to so that the tentacles of big government no longer reach you. this is the place where as long a
to go down a bit, but more jobs are being added, but why hasn't it reached rural america, and that's a bit of a crisis. he's targeting areas in southeast iowa, this part of illinois and missouri where he is now, that have not come back as fast as other areas. there's been an uneven aspect to the recovery, the midwest and south in general have seen some faster recovery than you have seen on the coasts, and then specifically then the difference between rural and urban america, where rural america has struggled, particularly these towns that were like one factory towns that sported the whole town and they're looking for that new one fact tore to re-support the town. >> you're in quincy, the president will talk about the urgent need to wall street reform, but i heard you speaking with andrea mitchell and yew own show earlier, that the president didn't even bring up goldman sachs and all the shenanigans that went on, if you will. what is the white house saying? >> deputy press secretary bill burton on the plane to quincy was asked specifically, well, he said the president will not comme
disciplines. and each operates uniquely with basically only two other institutions in america. and almost none around the world. the two in america being the national institutes of health, and national science foundation. where we allocate federal funds based on peer review. and so we bring the best and the brightest in america in various fields to assess projects or grants or scholarship. of one kind or another. and so when you ask about goals, one is to preserve the institution as it's come in to being. and has developed a rather wonderful track record. but beyond that, they are challenges of the time. and so i've laid forth two that i consider to be initiatives that aren't exactly goals but there's a hard, kind of thin line between a goal and an initiative. one i called bridging cultures where we're looking at putting a greater emphasis on what it is that makes a people a people. and then what it is that makes people differentiated. and we're a society that has a wondrous national culture. but we are also a mosaic of subcultures. so understanding ourselves is very important. and then we're
to testify later this afternoon. >>> meanwhile, halfway across the country in the heartland of america, president obama is kicking off his main street tour. the president making stops in three iowa cities. all have unemployment rates hovering around 10%. we'll hear from the president in about ten minutes. he's in ft. madison. we'll bring you his comments live. see the folks waiting there for the president. >>> we begin with the much anticipated testimony of a star witness at a heated senate hearing on the financial meltdown. the ceo of wall street giant goldman sachs lloyd blankfein is due to appear a little bit later today. other top goldman executives have been facing tough questioning from senators for hours now. >> do you think you contributed -- your actions contributed to the financial downturn that we experienced in 2008? >> do i think my personal actions did? >> goldman sachs's. >> you know, i don't know. i'd like to think about that and respond to you. i haven't thought about that specifically. >> you haven't thought about it? another key witness today, goldman whiz kid trader
, versus focusing what is wrong with america. as long as that is the attitude that you cannot do anything to uplift this country without feeling like you are handing out, giving handouts to someone, and you are against obama no matter what, because you feel for someone -- is going to benefit from it. host: thanks for the call. i am going back to another opinion piece. dan ball says the tea partiers movement is a reaction against obama and the democrats' agenda. sarah palin may be trying to become the movement's most prominent voice, but the real motivating force is the president and his policies. we are asking whether you think the tea partiers will have an impact on the upcoming elections. we read about charlie crist and the impact on the florida senate race. a democrat from brooklyn, new york. good morning. caller: good morning. it has become a habit to wake up and hear the conversation focused on the tea partiers movement. either you have nothing else to talk about -- i don't know if fox cable networks as influence in your studio. host: let me stop you. this program is a reflection of
eventually involves middle america and the center is? what is so wrong with wingnuts and i'm concerned when you talk about stopping them. isn't the idea of america to have free speech and allow america to express themselves any way they want to? >> i really appreciate that question. thank you. this is a great debate that has been going on. there are folks who've been trying to preach the idea that there is nothing more american than viewing colleges as an all or nothing bloodsport. that is as american as apple pie and of course it is absolutism disguised as apple pie. it is always, i'm not saying president obama wasn't born in america. i am just asking the question. wingnuts right now love to wrap themselves up in the american flag, and there is the sense that they are the true defenders of the founding fathers and it promotes an idea that i find air again. any political party should resume the american flag or the bible or the word of concept and freedom. the founding fathers as a reality check, weren't focused on uniting the nation, not dividing it. hamilton, madison warned about the dang
america that the political landscape is about to shift? let me give you my thinking on this. what i think we see happening is a change of who we are. see, america is not a country that is based on an ethnic heritage. america is an ideal. you can go and be born in louisiana and move to italy -- i have lived there 50 years and you will never be italian. when my grandfather came to america from italy, he became an american. [applause] . founding documents. we hear a lot about founding documents. i am talking about different founding documents. the founding documents upon which our founding documents were based for the judeo- were based for the judeo- christian we are the people of western civilization founded upon the bible. we believe in the dignity of every human person because we are created in the image of god. we believe in the collective ability of free and virtuous people to do more for our society them a benevolent, authoritarian government in betwoinstowing rights upon us. [applause] we believe in free markets and free enterprise. we believe in power of the individual. we beli
states. she didn't have to face the consequences of her reckless conduct while living in america. in 1996, evelyn was driving drunk in texas and fell asleep at the wheel and had a head-on collision. she had minor injuries, but in the collision, she killed her 18-year-old roommate and permanently paralyzed a third passenger. evelyn was indicted for intoxication manslaughter in texas and she was charged with a felony of drinking, driving and killing somebody. after posting bail, she and her parents snuck out of town and they headed backs to their home country of peru. mezick continues to live a lifestyle in peru without remorse or without reform. a few years ago, she put up a myspace page on the internet and posted pictures of herself drinking and partying with friends. she had a wild party, also drinking and partying with her girlfriends, complete with a male stripper and listed her favorite song. here is a photograph that she placed on the internet with some of her friends and she is the one with the drink, partying, having a good time, all the while escaping justice in texas for the crim
it was in this building that we were building a fan base. i still remember that day. it was a picture of what america is about. you have people from all different walks of life coming together. everybody was working hard. everybody knew there was a challenge coming. everybody was there because they figured if we were all working together then there was the reason why we cannot handle this. we had handled things before. that is the american spirit on display that is this theory -- spirit of quincy and illinois. it is good to be reminded that and come back to spend time with you. we spent some time in iowa and missouri and now back here. yay., misery. how about i attaci left? we are in illinois. over the last couple of days we have talked to workers who are busy building when a blaze for these wind turbines and by a few plants, family and small- business owners trying to navigate through tough economy and talk to farmers about what is happening. because it is folks like pawlenty live in towns like quincy and give america its heartbeat, that is why it is so important. if this sounds like this were worki
's not an after thought in america's quest for a brighter future. it is an essential part of that quest. so today i'd like to talk about the next chapter in this story. the challenges facing our space program are different and our imper tifs for this program are different than in decades past. we're no longer racing against an adversary. we're no longer competing to achieve a singular goal like reaching the moon. in fact, what was once a global competition has long since become a global collaboration. while the measure of our achievements has changed a great deal over the past 50 years, what we do or fail to do in seeking new frontiers is no less consequential for our future in space and here on earth. so let me start by being extremely clear. i am 100% committed to the mission of nasa and its future. [ applause ] because broadening our capabilities in space will continue to serve our society in ways we can scarcely imagine. because exploration will once more inspire wonder in a new generation, sparking passions and launching careers, and because ultimately if we fail to press forward in the purs
. this is not the sort of stuff that will fly with most americans out there. 20% of america, maybe half the republican party, perhaps. but not most americans. this isn't going to get job done in 2012 that's for sure. >> ron, i think once you investigate it for antiamericanism i think that you are on her list. here's michel bachmann on president obama on his nuclear pm policy. i'm confounded. since ronald reagan was one the great ideologist about getting rid of nuclear weapons in this war. let's listen to michelle bachmann. >> we found out that the president said that he was going to change the united states' strategy on dealing with nuclear weaponry, did this shock everyone? so if in fact there is a nation who is compliant with all the rules ahead of time and complied the united nations on nuclear proliferation, if they fire against the united states, a biological weapon, a chemical weapon, or maybe a cyberattack, well, then we weren't going to be firing back with nuclear weapons. >> i don't get that. i guess i'm waiting for the applause line there. but i guess i never thought of using nuclear weapons
into america. they saw a great opportunity through mexico. the overland route took them by monterey. here we are with all breaking loose and everybody is scared. you have a lot of people who are totally innocent and looking for safe haven and they are worried about others because we are arming the other side. the mexican army and police are dying every day to keep the drugs from coming and the bad guys come over here and get somebody to go buy some assault weapons because we did not institute the assault weapons ban. . . the real reason this anti- immigrant sentiment -- look at the numbers -- white male factory workers without a college degree got killed in the last decade. manson -- manon -- men in terms of wages killed even worse than women did. the economic downturn was basically on white male high- school graduates and women high school graphics with a couple of years of college that just got hit in the economy. but they will get more jobs with the economy grow. their taxes were be lower. the changes we will have to make will be slightly less draconian if you have more people contributin
of south carolina. senator graham carries the flag for the america envisioned by the founding fathers. jefferson and madison would like this senator. he honors the institutions of our republic. kpimpllyfys republican government as it was meant to be. good faith negotiation, finally, just as important, action. we debate, find agreement, we act. i've watched senator graham on any number of issues since he came to congress on an impressive number of occasions. he's been the indispensable lawmaker. accepts his oath to make the best possible laws for this country of wide opinion and patriotic passions. worked for the past year to find a bill that would meet america's current and near-term energy needs and also the need for renewals down the road and shown courage to offer prudent concern for co 2 emissions. deal in a realistic way of people living and working in the country illegally but also insists on a system preventing the hires of illegal immigrants. comprehensive reform, joined by john kerry and joe lieberman elected as an independent, what good americanism looks like. graham recentl
[inaudible] i was wondering with america just struggling to pay their bills, losing their jobs [inaudible] and fail to pay taxes on rental properties? [inaudible] nseries why are you such a disgrace? i have my tax returns. can i be free from other penalties? ♪ ♪ i want to introduce the next speaker a warrior here in washington, d.c. today in and day out is battling the injustice of the tax code. he formed the taxpayer protection pledge. he asked every candidate, every incumbent to sign it, reduce taxes this. he lives here in washington, d.c. but he is in part from washington, d.c. because he is a warrior who understands the tax code as well as anyone. i want you to give a big war round of applause for a fellow patriots, grover norquist from the americans for tax reform. [cheering] >> we have thousands of americans getting together today and over a thousand rallies in washington, d.c. and across america and it's not possible to thank all the people who took the time and effort to organize that but i would like to say special thank you to the three who did the most to make th
. if we jump cheap corn into latin america -- dump cheap corn into latin america, what happens to the corn farmer in latin america? i think we need to ask that question. it needs to be part of the conversation. because i can't imagine most people who are undocumented really wanting to have to leave their home, their families, their friends to come to a country that they don't know or they don't necessarily speak the language, where they don't necessarily really know anyone, to try to make a life. they probably would rather stay home. but there's something that is drawing them here and it probably has something to do with our, you know, the great economy of the united states, but it probably also has something to do with the trade and agriculture policy which put a lot of pressure on economies in this hemisphere. so, with that, madam speaker, i'm just going to say, i'm going to yield back for the close to congressman polis, madam speaker, who has really been a champion on this issue, who has really kept the fire burning on it and i think, madam speaker, that we all owe him a debt of gratitu
're going to continue to focus on bringing jobs back to america and to our people. i yield back. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. madam speaker, i would say this. always the gentleman likes to talk about the prior administration, and i would just like to point out that during the prior administration, the last two years of that, his party was in control of congress and certainly if we look at the numbers, did contribute to some of the problem that -- mr. hoyer: would the gentleman yield on that issue? mr. cantor: i'm not ready to yield yet, madam speaker. i would say there's plenty of blame to go around. but what we're trying to do is learn from mistakes that have taken place and go forward in a constructive manner. it's my sense that this nation is at a crossroads. we have serious challenges facing this country and last thursday was congress' deadline for passing a budget. and it is my strong belief that we must act and the gentleman indicates that we are going to act, but because of the critical nature of the challenges that we face, madam speaker, i believe that we've got three reasons
as a friend, and america is very fortunate to have his talent as secretary of agriculture. i am honored to be here, to be speaking with you. the first speaker at this club was theodore roosevelt. i do want to point out that both peter roosevelt and franklin roosevelt or assistant secretaries -- both theodore roosevelt and franklin roosevelt or assistant -- were assistant secretaries of the navy. [laughter] there was a time when the navy only had three commissioned brigades, the united states, the consolation, and the constitution. we had a tiny navy, and one which had never fought. since the days of the revolution, the navy had been pretty quiet, although you could make a pretty good argument that the reason america changed the articles of confederation to the constitution that we have today it was because we could not build a national and navy to deal with the barbary pirates. that was one reason for the changes in philadelphia in 1789. in 1798, then secretary of the navy had three ships, a few marines to sail on those ships, and a decidedly limited navy. today, things have changed a l
the president back in iowa. it's not just about 2012. the democrats have a problem in rural america and as conservative marco rubio enters the race for a florida senate he steps into the discussion about immigration. >>> most of what you're about to hear will make you mad or annoyed, anyway. some of it isn't 100% family friendly either like this from senator levin from michigan to goldman sachs executives he believes knowingly sold bad investments to clients and undermined financial markets in the process. >> june 22 is the date of this e-mail. boy, that timber wolf was one [ bleep ] deal. how much of that [ bleep ] deal did you sell to your clients after june 22, 2007? >> mr. chairman, i don't know the answer to that. but the price would have reflected levels that they wanted to invest in at that time. >> but you didn't tell them you thought it was a [ bleep ] deal. >> no, i didn't say that. >> no. who did? your people internally. and that's what the e-mails show. >> the hearing putting congress against goldman sachs is one act. another is an all too familiar of partisan duel or bl
in the 1950s. plus america's jobless. >> it makes me just question what's going to happen? what are we going to do? how are we going get through this? >> how are we going to get through from unemployed to the boss lady. a frustrated job seeker stitches herself a home-based business and tiger woods tees off at the masters today. what do you think of his week in the spotlight and how about this? what do you think about his new tv ad? our blog question today at cnn.com/tony. good morning, everyone. i'm tony harris. those stories and your comments right here, right now in the cnn "newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> we start with the setback in the search for four missing coal miners in west virginia. rescue crews made it inside the mine and they were forced to turn back because of the terrible air quality. >> they are in danger and that's the whole intent of evacuating them from the mine. >> okay, cnn's brooke bolduan on the scene from west virginia. first, the setback has got to be really tough to take for the family members waiting for any news at this point. >> reporter: yeah
. a lot of presidents we're talking about today. of course, dick is the author of "2010, take back america." all right, dick, so it's a little confusing. larry summers worked for president clinton. now he works for president obama and somehow in the middle it's president bush's fault. >> well, they're going to rename the san andreas fault in california president bush's fault. both sides have merit here. the underlying responsibility for this crisis is clearly the policies of the clinton administration because they required the fannie mac and freddie mae, fannie mae and freddie mac, i got them mistransvestite there to upgrade and increase the number of lower income mortgages to 50% of their portfolio that could only be done by issuing mortgages with no down payment required and with very loose financial terms. and then during the bush administration, bush tried to regulate fannie mae and chris dodd and barney frank filibus r filibustered the bill or in the senate dodd did and stopped it from passing. on the other hand, once you had the poison of these bad mortgages in the system, the decis
.s. taxpayer and they call it capitalism and what they're doing is stealing america's money. goldman sachs is a side show. reuben and summers created a system by which rich bankers could steal our money. >> this is the tip of the iceberg. you can catch dylan on financial reform, goldman sachs testimony today. he's on at 4:00 p.m. eastern time. among his guest, connecticut attorney and jim bunning and byron dorgan. >>> president obama's on his way to quincy, illinois to kick off his main street tour. this morning at the white house, he welcomed members of the bipartisan debt commission. >> we're not playing that game. i'm not going say what's in. i'm not going to say what's out. i want this commission to be free to do its work. >> the panel's expected to limit the deficit to $550 billion by 2015 and that would require a deficit savings in the range of $250 billion or more. president obama will also make three stops in iowa today to talk about economic recovery. >>> blockbuster earnings for ford today. they reported 2.1 billion bucks in the first quarter. today's report, big turnaround from
on in america, so it isn't really a choice for them, this culture. to me, the culture has to start from the top and i'm going to give you an example, and i'll be short, mr. chairman, as i always am. i was governor for eight years in west virginia and we were having unacceptably high death rates in hour mines. i decided that as chief executive, that is, c.e.o., that i would go to each of the mines where the mine inspectors would gather, after there had been a death. that had never happened before. there i was sitting, as there were trying to explain to each other what happened and who should have done what. things happened. everything was different, because the culture change took place at the top. now i'm not saying that i changed the world, but it did have an effect and that's why in a secret world it end of 35 miles of hard driving, and then a thousand to 2,000 feet underground, when only a few -- or only a few people from that state or from any state have ever been, it has to come from the top. it has to come from the top. >> mr. chairman, related to that, i have been down in an underground
night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> jim: the latest in the tragic coal mind accident. president bam has change in nuclear policy and iraqi president warns not to leave too soon, saying now is too soon. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening. i'm jim angle in for bret baier. the top story tonight, the efforts to find survivors and remains from the worst u.s. mining disaster since 1984. 25 miners are dead, four others are missing. the blast occurred monday at the massey energy company sprawling upper big branch mine about 30 miles south of charleston, west virginia. we have live fox team coverage in a few minutes. first, a new nuclear policy for the u.s. for decades, the u.s. has protected itself and its allies leaving open the possibility the u.s. would resort to nuclear weapons if necessary. now president obama says he is changing that, narrowing the circumstances as well as nations that might be threatened by the use of nuclear weapons. white hou correspondent mike emanuel has story from the pentagon. >> reporter: four top
in america, economics is the beginning and the end of most successful political endeavors. let's remember that arizona was the last state to approve a national holiday for martin luther king. and one of the things they did, it cost them hundreds of millions of dollars, when the african-american community across this country called for boycotts. finally, they were 50th, but they did it. they did it because they risked economics in the state of arizona. because, as you have stated, look, when the police intervene with me or with you or with anyone, it should be on the basis of our conduct. our behavior. not the country they suspect we came from and whether or not we were born here or not. that -- i'll tell you something. the criminal element, those human smugglers, the drug dealers, the rapists, those causing so much damage in arizona and across this country, they've got to be happy with this law. because what is going to happen is the eyes, the ears, that the police need so much of the community in general, so that they can combat crime, they're going to cause a division between the people
and illinois to continue another campaign of sorts. selling the recovery to small town rural america, which in these parts is still hurting a little bit. at a town hall yesterday, the president avoid the goldman chaos back in washington. he didn't have any four-letter words to drop but did get in a dig at republicans who he says a are blow blocking efforts to reform banking laws. take a listen how he basically says arizona has legalized racial profiling. >> you can imagine if you are a hispanic american in arizona, your great grandparents may have been there before arizona was even a state. but now suddenly, if you don't have your papers and you took your kid out to get ice cream, you're going to be harassed. that's something that could potentially happen. that's not the right way to go. >> now, savannah, that was part of a town hall. he wasn't planning on making immigration remarks but the audience knowing it was the news decided to ask. another issue in the news though that he avoided has been goldman. all that stuff was happening yesterday. he didn't say a word about goldman. it will be
in light of his former congregation run by reverend wright. >> god damn america. >> there is criticism. we'll take a look at it. >> whacky vad ventures of a ronald mc. >> bill: should ronald mcdonald be fired? that's what health activists want. the culture warriors are now involved. >> oh, that sure was a lot of fun. >> bill: caution. you where to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. ♪ >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. protecting the schneider family. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. in march of 2006. 20-year-old maureen lance corporal matthew schneider was killed in iraq. family was devastated. a week later matthew was buried that ceremony was interrupted by members of the westboro baptist church who traffic in expositions like this. >> search per phi. semper fag coming home in body bags. >> bill: these hateful fanatics believe that god is punishing america because the u.s.a. does not persecute gay people. led by a loon named fred phelps they interrupt funerals saying god killed their sons and daughters. it doesn't
to join the taliban. >>> and, kings of the court. duke just slip by america's favorite underdogs to become duke just slip by america's favorite underdogs to become ncaa top dogs. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning, i'm lynn berry. and today we begin with a devastating disaster. there are now at least 25 confirmed deaths, and four unaccounted for after an explosion ripped through a west virginia coal mine, in the worst u.s. mining disaster since 1984. a search has been halted for the four missing miners who would have enough food and water to survive for 96 hours, if they are alive and mobile. the explosion happened yesterday afternoon, about 30 miles south of charleston. the federal mine safety and health administration says miners were leaving on a vehicle that takes them in and out of the long shaft when the blast happened. now, the cause of the explosion is unknown. but the mine has a long history of frequent violations for not properly ventilating highly combustible methane gas. >>> later today, president obama is expected to announce new limits on
, that's all hours from now. the focus right now is you, me, and the rest of america getting those taxes done on time. lynn? >> tracy, don't remind us. >>> meanwhile, president obama will face a tough audience today when he heads to florida to outline his new policy for nasa. thousands of workers fear for their jobs with the space shuttle program scheduled to be grounded later this year, and some of the country's most high-profile astronauts are calling the president's plans, quote, devastating. >> reporter: after years as the home of america's space missions, today kennedy will host what is termed star wars. it's pitting some of the country's space pioneers against the president. >> we need to go once again where no man has gone before. there is no vision to this budget, no goal, no challenge. >> reporter: this week astronauts blasted president obama as he gets ready to announce its plans for na is for the future this afternoon. officials say that will include an extra $6 billion, some to be used to help lift a heavy-list rocket, capable of taking humans to mars. but it also eliminates
-- is often described the experience of living in america as a black man to experience something he attends to deep tissue muscle bruising. not the kind of thing you might be able to see but that kind of thing you feel, and make that makes itself present in the way that you might feel arthritis. what is there and it services and lets you know that it is there from time to time or go to the extent that he has that how does that inform? >> chris edley who is the dean of law school of berg weight and his non-obama for quite a while, and it is chris edley who once said race ain't rocket science. is much harder than rocket science. one of his friends at harvard law school practically from the first day of harvard law school was a woman named cassandra butts and cassandra butts worked with obama. she describes obama as a translator because of his unique -- the way you have an interpreter when you go to a foreign country and that person becomes your lens, and because obama grew up in a multiplicity of of worlds in a way that most of us do not, he is able to do that in a political sense. he can go
draconian when they treat illegal aliens when they are in arizona than anywhere else in america. >> you bet and thank goodness we live in the united states. >> i'm glad to hear that i hope you condemn that demagoguery as much as i do francisco. >> sean: hang on a second. let me advance a debate. president used this example of somebody that would go into an ice cream shop and be harrassed. if you read the bill, it's impossible. clearly the president hasn't, because the bill very specifically states, as i pointed out, that there must be prior legal contact. meaning there had to be some other law that were broken before one's immigration cus could be question ed by -- immigration cus could be questioned by the police department. so the president what he said to the american people in iowa in this town hall was inaccurate and untrue. you agree? >> i agree. what he should have said is what my enforcement agent friends call it when local authorities try to enforce federal laws they do a moad address, mexicans out after dark. what is happening you get a pretense offense he was speeding because you
build america bond program, which experts have called, and i quote, one of the economic recovery efforts biggest successes. well, we heard -- had a hearing last week on green jobs. and a distinguished reporter was here. was there, i think, for all of it. it went from 10:00 until 6:00 pm. it was a useful hearing, i think. and we're now looking at further legislation. and several business spokespersons had something to say that i thought was so significant from gm and dow about the need for an active public partnership with the private sector to develop technologies shaping our future. and these two people said it could not have happened only relying on markets themselves. and it was this that characterized programs of so many of you know in the recovery act. the battery grants which have helped to spark the beginning of a renaissance in michigan and elsewhere and industrially. it's interesting as i talked to my colleagues, how many of my colleagues say i come from the state that is going to be the new center of electric battery development. so many. and i look at them and i say, you know
a common goal. america's beverage companies have removed full-calorie soft drinks from schools, reducing beverage calories by 88%. together with schools, we're helping kids make more balanced choices every day. ♪ (laughing through computer) good night, buddy. good morning, dad. (announcer) oreo. milk's favorite cookie. right now, walmart has rolled back prices on top lawn care brands like poulan pro, brute by briggs & stratton, pennington, scotts and spectracide. along with thousands of others all over the store. it's rollback time! save money. live better. walmart. >>> if you own a ford, you're going to want to listen to this. we're getting word of 33,000 mid sized vehicles and suvs being recalled. here's the problem. if you're in a crash, the front seats might recline to the back and what that does is create a greater risk of tremendous injury there. here are the kinds of cars involved right now. some versions of the 2010 ford fusion, explorer, explorer sport track and the 2010 murcury milan. if you have a front seat recliner, you need to take that to your ford dealership. they are r
start, i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom" and welcome back to martha. martha: good morning to you, good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum and this massive explosion ripping through what is known as the upper big branch mine and it happened during a shift change yesterday. we're just learning that this mine had six violations , dealing with ventilation issues alone, just this year. that is since january. last year, the mine faced 48 what are called unwarrantable failure orders which are considered quite serious. among the dead in yesterday's blast, and we're learning all of these individual stories now as it comes to light, in one situation, three members of the same family, an uncle and two of his nephews who were all working together were found in close proximity inside this mine and today you've got all of the reaction of friends and family. >> we really just came to pray, because we don't have immediate family in the mines, but we know so many people that work here, our pastor works at this mine. >> i just started getting the phone calls, they asked me if kendall
between goldman sachs and a client facilitate lending and investing in america, to what judd gregg said. the reason we have wall street is to lend money to large businesses and small businesses and invest money in small businesses and large businesses. and goldman does a great job of that, or did historically. but the legalization of this type of speculation, which is now the bread and butter not only for lloyd blankfein, who is the poster child because the brand is so powerful, merrill lynch, umbrellas, deutsche bank, jpmorgan, this is a huge business model in the country, this type of rampant speculation on whether you can pay your bills. why is that part of our system, which is really where we're headed in these types of hearings and this type of trial. >> let's talk about fabulous fab, a colorful figure. >> i think fabrice at this point is more likely to come out as good as he is bad in this in the sense that i don't think anybody believes fabrice alone could conjure the security he's on trial for today. >> the one individual name. >> that he's the guy. it sounds like he's got a nic
. that everybody in every office building, on every farm and ranch, in every small business in america ought to be asking questions about what has become the new law of the land. i think the attorney general -- the attorneys general of the multiple states in this country, they started asking these questions as the process was going through and as they discovered nightmare after nightmare after nightmare as pertaining to the states, they started getting to be raddled and they started to say -- rattled and they started to say, this can't be. we can't be imposing this kind of will under the commerce claw -- clause. so i think it's important that we look at the 9th and 10th amendment and the commerce clause and i'm going to start off talking about some constitutional law here with my good friend dan burton and we're going to see how we figure this is. i think i've got -- yeah, here we go. i think everybody out there learned in school, we have a constitution and we have amendments to that constitution which is just part of the constitution, just came at a different time. and the amendments have a
of main street america, leaving them out would be another mistake. rather than focusing on concerns of wall street, i spend my time focusing on the concerns shared with me by my constituents back in missouri. missourians expect real reform, but demand that congress -- one specific area of concern is the creation of the so-called consumer financial protection bureau. the cfpb, this massive government bureaucracy has unprecedented authority and enforcement powers to impose duplicative mandates. we're not talking about big banks, but also your community banker, local dentist, as a result, there will be no choice but to pass these added costs on to consumers, the very bill is -- peep -- the people the -- people this bill was designed to protect. the only way to ensure the cfpb does not unintentionally hurt well-performing institutioning that issue credit is to narrow the scope and authority with clear language outlining who this new regulator will regulate. surely my colleagues would not want to vote for a bill that creates a new government bureaucracy without knowing exactly what the b
is too big? isn't that the whole idea of america, like trying to grow your company to become as big as possible? i don't know, that struck me as very interesting that now we're going to have a whole new era of determining whether or not companies are too big? >> well -- >> so if the republicans can block the vote today, the republicans will have a better footeding going forward to get a bill more to their liking. coming up straight ahead -- that's very true, steve. coming up, the reverend al sharpton threatening to fight arizona's new immigration law with civil disobedience. the sheriff next, he has something to say about that. >> please, don't stop the music. pop star rhianna takes a big tumble. and it's all caught -- >> there she goes. >> why does she wear those heels? >> tumble! [ isabella ] hi, i'm isabella, and this is pasta night at our house. [ laughter ] what is it about spaghetti and meatballs? i mean, it's a fun night. and the whole dinner is from great value at walmart. and it's all for less than $2 a serving. i have a budget like anyone else. this is what i did with mi
. they are not bad. t(we definitely have to build me nuclear power plants if we want to keep america energized. host: you have one in knoxville, don't you? caller: there are several around. i'm not an educated nuclear person but i studied it and we hire given all of our technologies away to the chinese, the french, and all of the world is using the technologies that we americans developed. i'm 72 years old. i watched the nuclear age coming in, and america needs nuclear energy now. host: isaac, boulder, colorado. a democrat. caller: i opposed -- to me, it seems like if we continue to -- you know, the waste is my concern with building new plants. as the caller prior from hanford, washington, suggests, that there is an ongoing issue with justification -- it is really a process that is already under way and we really have not resolved much because we are just pouring it up. host: here is a tweet -- hastings, michigan. gordy, a republican. caller: i am opposed to it definitely for two reasons. here in michigan we have some power plants and they are storing the waste in cement containers right along lake
than a decade ago is that they are so much cozier with corporate america today than they were a decade ago. and much more so than they let on in public. i think it's amazing and breath taking that greg greg, top lawyer, champion of the left, top lawyer in the obama white house before he was forced out in the champion of the left is now the sherpa for goldman sachs, or that dick gephardt, the leader of house democrats, the last event i saw him at was in iowa where he had all these union members around him rocking to ac/dc drinking beer because he was a champion of the labor movement. now he's out there advising goldman sachs. you see this across the board for the democratic party where they get so much money from wall street and so much money from corporate america that it makes it harder to paint republicans as being in the hip pocket of business. and i think that -- >> okay. >> -- that's covering the backdrop of the debate. >> i said something moderately nice about barack obama. i'm going to try another one. >> oh, good. this will be a good day. >> all right, here we go. since barack
to raise cost for community banks, small business people, for dealers, everybody in america. in the end not do what's right. another little thing. why aren't fannie and freddie in this bill? that's where it started, that's where it began. they ran us in the ground with bad mortgages, yet they completely conveniently ignore them. why is that? because they have been a sign for the democratic party. >> as you're speaking, we've got a full screen that outlines some of the big points in the gop plan for financial reform. so as you're speaking i want to throw those up so viewers are aware. one of those we've got is exactly what you just mentioned, ending taxpayer support of fannie mae and freddie mac. if that were to be included would be the gop be happy? >> they aren't going to be happy with one or two things. they are happy to get rid of the $50 billion bailout because they know the bailout is that the bill. that the allow bailouts for businesses. there's a lot of things in this bill we need to change. fannie and freddie is an important part that needs to be fighting for the bill. republica
. >> they came from across america. steve and i came from georgia. >> i just want to be left alone. i want my money to do what i want with it. >> they tend to be white, male, married and republican, according to a new cbs/new york times poll. rallies were held in iowa, illinois, in traditionally liberal madison, wisconsin, and dozens of other towns. organizers say hundreds of other towns. 84% have unfavorable opinions of the president. >> we are talking about barack obama. i do not think he cares about the u.s. >> some have extreme views of the president. >> [unintelligible] >> tea partiers are pushing a new contract for america, demanding smaller government and lower taxes. >> hundreds of people in support of less government and lower taxes relative in front of the courthouse today. david collins continued our coverage live from towson tonight. >> a lot of first-timer's showed up here and the other surprise, the poll results regarding tea party membership there was a profile published in today's "new york times." >> this is not about democrats or republicans or libertarians. this is about th
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